Monday, May 21, 2012

A Historic Decision

Tonight Town Meeting will decided the fate of the most historic neighborhood in Amherst, choosing to preserve forever the look and feel of the sacred Dickinson Homestead and immediate surrounding area, or allowing the creative whims of any owner who buys a piece of our collective core.

Henry Hills House built 1863
Leonard Hills House, built 1864 

Two ultra prime building lots on Main Street below Henry Hills House
The Hills Houses built by father and son, designed by architect William Fenno Pratt
First Congregational Church (center)  opposes historic district restrictions
Tacky signs like this (on left) would be regulated by Historic District rules--but they probably are now anyway
Railroad Street Station, built 1853
The Evergreens, home to Austin Dickinson, built 1856

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Is this too going to get chewed up by the forces of distrust in Town Meeting?

LarryK said...

Carol Gray will do her best of course, but I think it will pass.

DaveMB said...

Did you see the letter from Carlton and Nancy Brose in the Bulletin, saying that there 100-year-old non-historic house falls within the boundaries of the district, and thus that they would be regulated in ways they would not like?

LarryK said...

To quote Commander Spock, "The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few."

Anonymous said...

Gotta support the "needs of the few" argument on this. Anyone whose property rights are infringed by establishment of such a district, should be fairly compensated.

Anonymous said...

I agree with anon 7:43.

LarryK said...

Well I guess we're going to find out, as Town Meeting easily passed the article on a voice vote.

Anonymous said...

Historical values should be valued, life doesn't have a restore button. Once its gone, its gone... Forever. Cherish our heritage. Is there not a creative mind that can preserve and protect AND progress?