Thursday, April 30, 2015

A Centennial After The Horror


About 50 people gathered in front of Amherst Town Hall to hear Select Board member Jim Wald read a proclamation issued by the town to remember the "mass extermination" of the Armenian population 100 years ago.

Ellen Story addresses the crowd.  Adrienne Terrizzi and Gregory Bascomb on her left, Marian Mesrobian MacCurdy and Jim Wald on her right

Even today Turkey, in an attempt to whitewash history, bans the word "genocide".

But as long as there are good people who pause to remember the horror and pass it down through talks and the written word, it's a sad chapter in human history that can be avoided in the future.

  Marian Mesrobian MacCurdy, author of the book, 'Sacred Justice: The Voices and Legacy of the Armenian Operation Nemesis', addresses the crowd

18 comments:

Walter Graff said...

We need go no further than this country for a history of genocide and the lack of use of the term and denial.

Anonymous said...

Walter Graff, when has the U.S. committed "Genocide," the targeted killing of a group of people of one race with the intent to exterminate that race?

Walter Graff said...

Oh let's see... the 500 year war where the reduction of the North American Indian population was reduced from an estimated 10 million in 1500 to barely 250,000 in 1900. Yeah I know, it never happened. We seem to hear that in many countries about genocide from Germany to Rowanda to Turkey. Here we simply excluded the truth from history and rather we made TV shows about Cowboys and savage Indians.

You ought to visit the American Indian Genocide Museum in Dallas. Quite moving actually.

Anonymous said...

Good thing my grandparents came here after slavery and the genocide of the Indians. Otherwise, I might feel guilty. As it is , I do not.

Anonymous said...

We only need to go back a few moments and look at how the protesters were locked up in Baltimore just a few days back and locked 10-15 in a 10x10 room with little water, no charges or explanation of what is happening for days....this included reporters, bloggers and housewives.

The concept of humans treating other humans as trash is not over and it still strongly exists in both Amherst and Baltimore.

We all know that the US is the nation of Mass Incarceration. We also know that once someone is locked up, even without charges, most of us don't care about them anymore. The most unthinkable things happen in our publicly sponsored jails. Most young folks know that a trip to jail, even with no charges, may leave them crippled and will likely leave them mentally unstable from mistreatment or false imprisonment.

History is interesting, current events are pressing....more than 1 out of 20 of the kids you know will be locked up within a decade by our collective system. More than 1 out of 20 of your kids will be locked up. 1 out of 20 of the kids you grew up with have been locked up, many for no legit reason. More than one kid per American classroom, over and over and over and over. You don't talk to them about it, they are locked up, and are likely considered scum.

Anonymous said...

Where are you getting these statistics? Please cite a source for these claims you make. What you say would be more believable if you did.

Nina Koch said...

Here is some more information about mass incarceration:

Ted talk by Bryan Stevenson

ACLU initiative

Anonymous said...

Put out by the ACLU...cletely unbiased I suppose. No agenda there of course. Lol

Anonymous said...

Er...completely

Nina Koch said...

Of course they have an agenda. Every organization has an agenda. That's why they form an organization -- to carry out their agenda.

If someone's agenda is to fight injustice, I'm with them.

Anonymous said...

The ACLU defends Islamic Radicals. Don't stand with them, please.

Anonymous said...

The ACLU defense is lame radicals. And you going to stand with them?

Anonymous said...

Let's not forget the ACLU also defends NAMBLA. ACLU are lawyers. They'll defend anyone with the money to pay. Oh--except you. They won't have the time of day for you. And we should trust their stats??

Nina Koch said...

They get their stats from federal sources like the Bureau of Justice statistics. If you'd like to see it presented by a different organization, try this:

prisonpolicy.org

This posting discusses some of the issues in data collection and also presents a long list of primary sources you can click on.

Anonymous said...

Do we view drug offenses as "victimless?"

Anonymous said...

I love the idea that drug offenses are considered victimless crime. Tell that to the families of those who died either using or dealing. Or the families of those cops who died upholding the law.

Anonymous said...

And what do you mean by "most of us?" And what would you have us do? Not enforce the laws?

Anonymous said...

Mass incarceration does not exist. We do not "mass incarcerate." I suppose you think that we shod just turn a blind eye to lawbreakers. Go ahead and by all means change the laws.